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For Kings And All Those In Authority

For Kings And All Those In Authority

1 Timothy 2:1-4 New International Version

2 I urge, then, first of all, that petitions, prayers, intercession and thanksgiving be made for all people— 2 for kings and all those in authority, that we may live peaceful and quiet lives in all godliness and holiness. 3 This is good, and pleases God our Savior, 4 who wants all people to be saved and to come to a knowledge of the truth.

Paul was a man of prayer and understood the importance of prayer. Here he writes to Timothy who has taken over for him in Ephesus. In ministry Timothy was facing many challenges. Paul had written to him that God has not given us a spirit of fear, but of love, power, and sound mind (1 Timothy 1:7). The key to success in ministry and seeing the kingdom of God advanced in the earth is consistent, unceasing prayer.

Here Paul says that he urges that first of all that petitions, prayers, intercession, and thanksgiving be made for all people. Petitions is the Greek word δέησις and means entreaty, request, plea, prayer. Refers primarily to a petitionary prayer.[1] Prayers is the Greek word προσευχή and means prayer, place of prayer. What a person prays; place of prayer[2]. Intercession is the Greek word ἐντυγχάνω and means a lighting upon, meeting with. 2. conversation. 3. a petition[3]. Thanksgiving is the Greek word εὐχαριστία and means thanks, thanksgiving. Describes the expression and experience of being thankful and the action of giving thanks.[4]. What we see here is that Paul is calling for many types of prayer. When we spend time in prayer we are called to be led by the Holy Spirit. Our prayer life should never be mechanical but should always follow the leading of the Holy Spirit. Ultimately it is prayer that brings forth kingdom advancement. It is prayer confronts the plans and purposes of the enemy and brings them to nothing.

Often we can allow our personal feelings about a person or especially those who hold governmental office impact the way we pray. But we need to see all people and especially those in political office as God sees them. Before knowing Christ every person is lost and influenced by the devil. They are simply chasing after that which seems appealing to them. But we know from God’s word that the heart of the king is in the hand of the Lord and He will move it as He desires (Proverbs 21:1). If we truly understand this then we can see how praying for people and especially those who are kings or in position of government authority can impact them in real tangible ways.

The result of praying for all people and especially those who are kings is it will impact our personal way of life. Paul writes that we may live peaceful and quiet lives in all godliness and holiness. There is no greater impact we can make on the leaders of our nation than to personally be praying for them. We may not be able to sit down with them and have a face-to-face meeting. But every time we go before the Lord in prayer we have the opportunity to personally impact them. It not only will impact their lives, but in turn will impact our own life.

When we pray for all people and those in authority it is good and pleases God our savior. Our life aim should be to please God in everything. Our lives are called to be living sacrifices and we are called to be consecrated and set apart for the will of God. The reason this is pleasing to God is His desire is that all men would come to salvation and that none would perish (2 Peter 3:9). Though we may look at wicked leaders at times and wish that God would unleash His wrath upon them, this is not what He has called us to do.

We must remember when Jesus walked through Samaria and was rejected, and James and John wanted to call fire down upon the people (Luke 9:54). Jesus didn’t agree with them but corrected them and told them they didn’t know what spirit they were of. They were being influenced by a spirit that wasn’t the spirit of God. Our prayer for all people should be that they would come to repentance. They would turn from their wickedness and sin and know the grace and mercy found in Jesus Christ.

God’s ultimate desire is he wants all people to be saved and to come to a knowledge of the truth. The major tool and vehicle through which God does this is not only the preaching of the gospel, but it is the faithful prayers of God’s people. Imagine if the body of Christ would simply become a house of prayer the impact we would have in our community and nation. So many times, we are reactionary when it comes to prayer when it should be our first priority and we should simply bring all things before God in prayer.

We have been giving kingdom authority by Jesus Christ (Matthew 18:18-20). Jesus tells us wherever two or more agree it is done. Whatever we bind on earth is bound in Heaven and whatever we loose on earth is loosed in heaven. He is communicating to us clearly to get us to understand what we do here in the natural physical realm impacts what takes place in the spiritual realm. May we commit each day to pray for those who are unsaved and especially for those who are in governing positions and in authority.

Prayer

Father help me to be a person of prayer. Help me to pray for those who are in positions of government and authority. Regardless of where they stand on issues, I pray that you would give them wisdom and understanding. Father turn their heart to you. I pray they would come to a saving knowledge of Jesus Christ. Father help me to remember this is a spiritual battle and help me to understand the power of prayer and the authority I have in Jesus. I pray that your will would be done in the heart and minds of all leaders. In the name of Jesus, Amen!

[1] Daniel DeWitt Lowery, “Prayer,” ed. Douglas Mangum et al., Lexham Theological Wordbook, Lexham Bible Reference Series (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2014). [2] Daniel DeWitt Lowery, “Prayer,” ed. Douglas Mangum et al., Lexham Theological Wordbook, Lexham Bible Reference Series (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2014). [3] G. Abbott-Smith, A Manual Greek Lexicon of the New Testament (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1922), 156. [4] John Frederick, “Praise and Thanksgiving,” ed. Douglas Mangum et al., Lexham Theological Wordbook, Lexham Bible Reference Series (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2014).

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